Why Do We use Anthroposophical Adjunct Therapies?
  

<< back

By: Alicia Landman-Reiner, M.D.

Why Do We use Anthroposophical Adjunct Therapies?

...because they are wonderful!

Medicinal remedies are often taken by mouth. In his Agriculture Course* Rudolf Steiner tells us that the food we eat actually only builds the substance of our nervous system, while the rest of the substance of our organism is built from what we take in through the skin, through breathing, and through our senses! This astonishing idea makes sense when we add the thought that our nervous system is more like the world of physics and chemistry, while our rhythmical system is more alive, less akin to the principles we use in ordinary science—more of a mystery to our ordinary consciousness. Breathing is a mystery—a miracle in itself. And Steiner suggests that the metabolic system is still further refined, still further removed from merely ordinary physical laws.

Therapies are taken in through the skin (massage, compresses, embrocations, baths), through breathing (etheric oils and herbal compresses with their wonderful scents), and through our senses (the world of color, sound, and form we meet in artistic therapies). Perhaps through these therapies, we find nourishment, renewal, and healing right into the refined, miraculous substance of our metabolism.

The therapies also offer a different kind of experience for the patient than medicines taken by mouth. Remedies—medicaments— address the organism in one particular way. They are a direct extension of the doctor's assessment of the patient. His/her concepts of the patient's illness and therapy translate into a healing plant or mineral. The concept is in the remedy. The doctor's thoughts, the doctor's love, and the doctor's will, accompany the remedies—but s/he is not present when the remedies are taken.

With other therapies, another human being is directly present for the person who is ill. This has a tremendous dynamic—a power to activate the healing process, as the therapist accompanies the patient in the deep loneliness that can come with pain and suffering. The nurse's comforting presence, as well as skill, powerfully enhances healing. Similarly the massage therapist, bath therapist, artistic or musical therapist, or counselor, personally accompany the patient through the therapeutic process. Perhaps they are a kind of ferryman. The patients must cross the river—but they are not alone.

Alicia Landman-Reiner, MD has a practice in Massachusetts and directs a training course in anthroposophical medicine for young physicians. For information contact PAAM.  Anthroposophical adjunct therapy disciplines are practiced by licensed and certified practitioners usually in relation to, and under the supervision of a physician. They are a means of extending the care of the patient to include all aspects of health in a holistic way.





<< back

Dynamic Content Management by ContentTrakker